logo
The Best Of Hong Kong
Lifestyle News
By Yannie Chan | September 17th, 2019

Hong Kong is known for many things — and quick, affordable and delicious fast food chains are one of them. Here are some of our favorites!


Tam Jai Sam Gor Mixian 譚仔三哥米線

 

Tam Jai is the ultimate comfort food and all-purpose dining option for the late 80s generation and younger. Mixian refers to “rice noodles,” and they come in various spicy soup bases such as sour-spicy and mouthnumbing-spicy, in ten spiciness levels — from 特辣 “extra hot” to 10小辣 “10 little spicy.” In Hong Kong pop culture, Tam Jai is also often known for the signature accented Cantonese spoken by their staff members (see the viral “Rap of TamJai” ad here).

There are two Tam Jai chains: Tam Jai 譚仔 and Tam Jai Sam Gor 譚仔三哥. The chains separated years back when the founding brothers decided to break out on their own, but now they’re back on good terms and the food quality is similar. The most notable difference is that only Sam Gor offers the 三哥酸辣 Sam Gor Sour-Spicy soup base, which is a mix of sour-spicy and mouthnumbing-spicy. It’s the soup base I personally recommend. Start out at 5小辣 “five little spicy” if you’re not sure how much heat you can handle.

Various locations all over Hong Kong.


Hong Kong Nam Kee Noodle 香港仔南記粉麵

Hong Kong Nam Kee Noodle 香港仔南記粉麵

Nam Kee and Tam Jai are the two big noodle giants in Hong Kong. Disclaimer: I prefer Tam Jai to Nam Kee. Nam Kee is more about the nostalgic flavors, the containers of chili oil on the tables, and the hustling in order to get a seat. You don’t expect much when you walk in, but somehow, after munching into those chewy and savory fishballs, you walk out satisfied.

Various locations in Hong Kong, mostly on Hong Kong island.


Satay King 沙嗲王

Satay King 沙嗲王. Photo: Flickr / scaredykat

Satay King serves a delicious range of classic Cantonese dishes such as pork cutlet curry rice, satay noodles, baked rice, and deep-fried tofu. First-time visitors will be taken aback by its flamboyant and unashamedly dingy decor. Fake palm trees, fake caravans, and pirate statues are randomly placed in various corners, in true Hong Kong 無厘頭 “mo lei tau” nonsensical fashion. It’s the go-to dinner place for students and office workers looking to save some pennies.

Various locations in Hong Kong, most prominent in more “grassroots” neighborhoods such as Mong Kok, Kwun Tong and Tsuen Wan.


Fairwood 大快活

Fairwood 大快活

Available everywhere in the city (more than 140 branches) and known as a working class hangout, Fairwood is versatile. Appropriate for breakfasts with family, lunch with schoolmates or colleagues, and a late dinner after working overtime, Fairwood’s menu covers a lot of ground. You can find breakfasts, curry, Cantonese-style roasted meat, pork patty, vegetarian options, French toast, chicken wings as well as giant slaps of pork chop served on a sizzling metal plate here.

Various locations all over Hong Kong.


Kam Kee Cafe 金記冰室

Kam Kee Cafe 金記冰室

A more recent chain, Kam Kee Cafe feels and tastes more authentic than other cha chaan teng-style chains. Uncle Kam first opened shop in Shau Kei Wan in 1976, but as he neared retirement age, he sold his business in 2013. Kam Kee started opening more shops, now reaching 11 branches around town. Their 乾炒牛河 dry-fried beef with rice noodles, and Hong Kong-style milk tea are perfect for when there’s no time to visit your favorite CCT in Wan Chai or Sham Shui Po.

Various locations in Sai Wan, Kennedy Town, Causeway Bay, Kowloon Tong, Kwun Tong, Cyberport and more.


Wing Nin Noodle 永年士多

Wing Nin Noodle 永年士多

We finally have a delicious and fail-safe cart noodle shop chain! At its best, cart noodles are a treat from the heavens. In the wrong hands, however, they can taste vile. Wing Nin Noodle is a famous long-time establishment in Yuen Long, beloved for its secret spicy sauce and flavorful toppings.

Various locations in Yuen Long, Causeway Bay and Tsim Sha Tsui.