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The Best Of Hong Kong
Lifestyle News
By Ashley Soo | August 15th, 2022

Cantonese soup is comfort food for most Hongkongers. Not only is it rich in flavors and nutrition, but it is also the soul of home meals, to which we reserve our first and last sip to complete the evening. Scroll down for some of the most popular soups that can be found on every dining table in a Hong Kong household — and how to make them. 

Tomato and Potato Pork Bone Soup

Ten out of 10 Hongkongers would name Tomato and Potato Pork Bone soup as their favorite because everyone basically grew up drinking it. Prepared with tomato, rich in antioxidants, vitamins C and K and potassium, and potato, and a good source of fiber, the soup helps reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. Replace the pork bone with vegetable stock if you are vegan — it tastes just as good.

Simplified Steps: 

1 Boil your pork bone with cold water and ginger slices to get rid of impurities.

2 Add tomato and potato chunks, and water into the pot.

3 Turn on your stove to medium and high heat.

4 Once it started boiling, simmer the soup on low heat for 90 minutes.

5 Add salt to taste and enjoy!

Detailed recipe here.

Seaweed Soup with Egg

Image: The Woks of Life

A simple yet delicious seaweed soup with egg makes for a quick and nutritious meal. The star of the show, dried seaweed, is a superfood that holds small amounts of vitamins A, C, E and K, along with folate, zinc, sodium, calcium and magnesium. It can be turned into a vegetarian-friendly option by removing the baby shrimps from the recipe. 

Simplified Steps:

1 Slightly toast your dried seaweed and dried baby shrimps in a wok for enhanced flavor.

2 Add water to the same wok and bring it to boil.

3 Pour your beaten eggs in and stir them into the soup with your chopsticks.

4 Add salt and sesame oil to taste and enjoy!

Detailed recipe here.

Watercress and Dried Duck Kidney Soup

Image: Ulifestyle

First things first, don’t yuck my yum. Watercress and dried duck kidney soup is one of Cantonese people’s favorite dishes, especially during autumn. Rich in vitamin K and antioxidant contents, watercress is known in the Chinese community for supporting our respiratory system. It is also believed that the vegetable helps restore the menstrual flow, meaning that pregnant women are advised against enjoying the soup. 

Simplified Steps:

1 Thoroughly wash your watercress.

2 Boil your pork bone and dried duck kidney with cold water to get rid of impurities. 

3 Add all your ingredients (except for watercress) and water to a pot and bring it to boil.

4 Add watercress into the pot and reduce to low heat to simmer for another 2 hours.

5 Add salt to taste and enjoy!

Detailed recipe here.

Corn and Carrot Soup

Image: Foodgawker.com

Corn and carrot are both known for their health benefits for your eyes, thanks to the beta carotene and lutein, as well as carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which these ingredients contain respectively. Simple to make with a refreshing and sweet taste, the corn and carrot soup is the one soup that even the pickiest kid couldn’t resist. 

Simplified Recipe:

1 Boil your pork bone with ginger slices and cold water to get rid of impurities. 

2 Add in carrots, corn and water and bring the soup to boil on medium to high heat.

3 Reduce to low heat to simmer for another 2 hours.

4 Add salt to taste and enjoy!

Detailed Recipe here.

Lotus Root Pork Bone Soup with Peanuts

Image: The Woks of Life

Made with lotus root, pork ribs and peanuts, this soup is another traditional Cantonese soup that flaunts a slightly toasted, nutty aroma. Thicker in texture yet refreshing on the palate, the soup is rich in antioxidant contents and vitamins that aids our immune system while preventing heart diseases. 

Simplified Recipe: 

1 Soak peanuts in hot water until soften and discard the water.

2 Boil your pork bone and cold water to get rid of impurities. 

3 Assemble all ingredients into the pot and boil with water on medium to high heat.

4 Reduce to low heat and simmer for another 2 hours.

5 Add salt to taste and enjoy!

Detailed recipe here.

Sea Bass Milky Soup

Image: Souped Up Recipes

Unlike other cuisines, Chinese people seldom prepare soups with milk or any dairy products. The soup gets its name from its milky white appearance and texture, which happen to be the protein and collagen of the fish all helping to emulsify the soup. Ginger, loaded with antioxidants and believed to maintain internal body heat, is usually used to balance the seafood’s fishy taste, and also adds extra nutrition to the soup. 

Simplified Recipe:

1 Pan-fry the sea bass on both sides with ginger slices.

2 Add hot water to the pan and let it boil for 10 minutes.

3 Reduce to low heat and let it simmer until the soup turns white.

4 Add salt and white pepper to taste, enjoy!

Detailed recipe here.

Pear Soup

Image: Asian Inspirations

If you happened to have read our article about Chinese herbal teas, you wouldn’t be unfamiliar with pear soup (or pear tea). Great as both a savory and sweet soup, this dish is rich in fiber and vitamins that help with fighting inflammation and promoting gut and heart health. Cantonese people like preparing the soup also with white fungus and dried apricot kernels for extra flavor and health benefits. 

Simplified Recipe:

1 Soak white fungus with water for 15 minutes or until softened.

2 Boil your pork bone with ginger slices and cold water to get rid of impurities. 

3 Assemble all ingredients into a pot. Add water to bring it to boil on medium to high heat.

4 Reduce to low heat and simmer for another 2 hours.

5 Add salt to taste and enjoy!

Detailed recipe here.

Winter Melon Soup

Image: The Spruce Eats

You might have seen it served in a whole winter melon in some Cantonese restaurants. Usually made with winter melon, pork ribs, and dried shitake mushrooms, winter melon soup is known for the vitamin C and antioxidants it carries which help protect your body from cell damage and conditions like diabetes and heart disease. 

Simplified Recipe:

1 Soak dried shitake mushrooms in water until softened.

2 Boil your pork bone with ginger slices and cold water to get rid of impurities.

3 Assemble ingredients and boil with water on medium to high heat.

4 Simmer for 2 more hours on low heat.

5 Add salt and white pepper to taste and enjoy!

Detailed recipe here.

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