The Best of Hong Kong
Lifestyle News
By Lulu Jeh | January 11th, 2023

Dear Lulu Jeh, 

For lack of a better expression, I’m burnt out. My Sheung Wan district-based marketing job might not be the most demanding ever, but the streaks of days of working overtime really add up after a good few weeks. I’ve got no team to fall back on, and it’s been a quarter of a year since I last had a day off, despite the abundance of public holidays in HK and my generous annual leave package. I’m just so tired.

I think anyone reading this would say it’s a sensible idea to want to quit, but my salary is just too considerable for me to make up my mind. I really need a break, but I also need to provide for my family. What should I do? – Employee of the Month

Dear Employee of the Month,

My sympathies are with you, I can tell it’s super tough just from the way you’re describing it. Even though it is crucial to be financially stable, you have to bear in mind that work should not stress you out so much. It’s all about maintaining balance in everything you do, and the balance is certainly broken in the way you work.

Before reaching a decision, make a mental note (or a physical one if you need affirmations) of the pros and cons of leaving your job, or alternatively, keeping it. Focus on how you feel and what you value, and see how both scenarios would play out.

Say if you were to stay, would you be able to find more time for yourself and set strong boundaries? Would it help if you spoke to your boss? And if you were to go, would the reduced income bother you? Would your financial responsibilities become a huge burden? Should you have something lined up first?

Ask yourself questions and make sure you have an answer to each one of them. Don’t rush to a conclusion before you’re certain.

But on a more subjective note, the fact that you’re pondering resignation should be a sign that you might want to explore other career opportunities, or even just take a short break. Money isn’t the most important thing, it’s most ideal if you can earn enough while having time to yourself — balance, remember.

– Lulu


Have a question for Lulu Jeh? Write to letters@theloophk.com for some anonymous relationship advice. Read more of Lulu Jeh’s sage advice here.

  • By Lulu Jeh | January 11th, 2023

    Dear Lulu Jeh, 

    For lack of a better expression, I’m burnt out. My Sheung Wan district-based marketing job might not be the most demanding ever, but the streaks of days of working overtime really add up after a good few weeks. I’ve got no team to fall back on, and it’s been a quarter of a year since I last had a day off, despite the abundance of public holidays in HK and my generous annual leave package. I’m just so tired.

    I think anyone reading this would say it’s a sensible idea to want to quit, but my salary is just too considerable for me to make up my mind. I really need a break, but I also need to provide for my family. What should I do? – Employee of the Month

    Dear Employee of the Month,

    My sympathies are with you, I can tell it’s super tough just from the way you’re describing it. Even though it is crucial to be financially stable, you have to bear in mind that work should not stress you out so much. It’s all about maintaining balance in everything you do, and the balance is certainly broken in the way you work.

    Before reaching a decision, make a mental note (or a physical one if you need affirmations) of the pros and cons of leaving your job, or alternatively, keeping it. Focus on how you feel and what you value, and see how both scenarios would play out.

    Say if you were to stay, would you be able to find more time for yourself and set strong boundaries? Would it help if you spoke to your boss? And if you were to go, would the reduced income bother you? Would your financial responsibilities become a huge burden? Should you have something lined up first?

    Ask yourself questions and make sure you have an answer to each one of them. Don’t rush to a conclusion before you’re certain.

    But on a more subjective note, the fact that you’re pondering resignation should be a sign that you might want to explore other career opportunities, or even just take a short break. Money isn’t the most important thing, it’s most ideal if you can earn enough while having time to yourself — balance, remember.

    – Lulu


    Have a question for Lulu Jeh? Write to letters@theloophk.com for some anonymous relationship advice. Read more of Lulu Jeh’s sage advice here.